Onion

Sweet and biting, with its characteristically prickly aroma and staggering versatility, onions are ubiquitous to the global culinary scene. The pungency and bite of the raw onion is determined by the type of onion in question and the sulfur content of the soil, which enters the roots as sulphate salts and converts in the onion to sulphur-containing amino acids. These sulfuric compounds are what make you cry when you cut raw onions; even though sweet onions can contain nearly 20% more sugar compounds than their less sweet counterparts, the sulfur they’ve absorbed can still be aggressive and tear-inducing. All onions, regardless of low or high sugar content, become much more sweet and much less pungent when cooked.

Onions are some of the oldest plants that man cultivated for domestic use. Because they leave negligible amounts of debris behind and are adaptable to a wide range of soils and climates, their origins are difficult to pinpoint. Most researchers agree, though, that onions have been a food crop for more than 5,000 years, most likely originating in central Asia. They were in use in Egypt in 3500 BCE, in Bronze Age gardens in China in 3000 BCE, and a story from Sumer (modern-day Iraq) in 2500 BCE tells of a provincial governor who claimed the best and most fertile lands around a temple as his own. He then had “the gods’ own oxen” plow his fields and tend to his onion patch. Per capita onion consumption in the US stood at 12.2 pounds per person in 1982; today, it’s risen to 20.5 pounds per person and thanks to increased interest in cooking at home, shows no sign of letting up.

The process of drying onions pulls the liquid out of the onion, leaving the strong flavor and aroma.  Our onion products are all grown and processed in California except for our shallots, which are cultivated in India.

 

1-2/3 Tablespoons of Minced Onion = 1 medium onion, chopped

1 Tablespoon Granulated Onion = 1 medium onion, chopped

1 Tablespoon of Onion Powder = 1 medium onion, chopped

1 Tablespoon Granulated Onion = 1 Tablespoon Onion Powder

California Granulated Onion
California Granulated Onion
Granulated Onion, Allium cepa, is also called onion granules. Granulated Onion has an essential oil of .01% to .015%.  
California Minced Onion
California Minced Onion
When you choose California Minced Onion, you’re choosing powerful flavor and great texture.
California Onion Powder
California Onion Powder
Finely ground California Onion Powder exposes the maximum amount of an onion’s surface area, delivering pure flavor with no delay.
California Toasted Granulated Onion
California Toasted Granulated Onion
California Toasted Granulated Onion delivers bold and savory flavor, tempered by roasting to coax out an onion’s sweet caramel notes locked inside.
California Toasted Minced Onion
California Toasted Minced Onion
Toasted to savory perfection, our California Toasted Minced Onion provides the deep, satisfying smell and flavor of roasted onions, with a little bit of texture and none of the tears.
California Toasted Onion Powder
California Toasted Onion Powder
Do you want the sweet, deep flavor of toasted onions without tears or toasting?
Dried Shallots
Dried Shallots
Dried Shallots (pronounced “sha-luhts"), Allium cepa variety aggregatum, are also called dry shallots, dried shallot, or dehydrated shallots.
Organic California Granulated Onion
Organic California Granulated Onion
Dehydrated, concentrated, and ground into flavor-packed granules, our Organic California Granulated Onion lets you enjoy the sweet pungency of onions without worries over unknown pesticides or harm
Organic California Minced Onion
Organic California Minced Onion
Cut into a fine mince, our Organic California Minced Onion provide the pungent taste of onion in a versatile form without concern over pesticides or hidden chemicals.
Organic California Onion Powder
Organic California Onion Powder
The sweet softness of Organic California Onion Powder may look unassuming, but it’s loaded with bold onion flavor.
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